THIS WEEK’S SUMMARY AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: CREATIVITY AND COLLEGE WRITING

In the September 2015 College Composition and Communication, Patrick Sullivan argues that composition should not relegate creativity to the creative writing classroom but should join other fields in seizing its potential as a vital component of cognition, transfer, problem-solving, and critical thinking and as a “luminous human capacity” that can be learned by anyone. http://tinyurl.com/okv4rpe

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NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: ENGAGING STUDENTS WITH ARCHIVES

VanHaitsma, Pamela. “New Pedagogical Engagements with Archives: Student Inquiry and Composing in Digital Spaces.” College English 78.1 (2015): 34-55. Web. 2 Sept. 2015.

Pamela VanHaitsma discusses an approach to involving students in archival research that she developed in first-year-writing classes at the University of Pittsburgh. Maintaining that students explore as well as create archives throughout their activities both in and outside of class, VanHaitsma hopes to connect the kinds of inquiry that archives make possible with the focus on student interest and lives that informs writing pedagogy. She also investigates how digital collection and dissemination options affect the process of using and building an archive. College Composition Weekly Banner.

NEW POST AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: CRITIQUE OF ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING IN SCHOOL AND COLLEGE, RTE AUGUST 2015

Todd DeStigter of the University of Chicago critiques the emphasis on argumentative writing in schools and college, examining three widespread assumptions: that learning to write good arguments will develop thinking skills, prepare for good democratic citizenship, and enhance students’ potential for sociocultural mobility. Valorizing rational argument, DeStigter argues, closes off many legitimate and often more effective forms of personal and political action.College Composition Weekly Banner

NEW THIS WEEK ON COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY! Pamela Takayoshi on “Short-Form” Writing for the Internet

Writing in the July issue of Computers and Composition, Takayoshi argues that composition studies has paid too little attention to increasingly common and prominent forms of communication like the Facebook postings and chats she analyzes. Such writing, she says, deserves empirical study, especially with regard to “what writers do” as they compose. She urges supplementing what she sees as composition’s longstanding “social turn” with fine-grained examination of actual writers’ processes working with current technologies in order to better understand how these processes relate to the composing processes taught in college writing classrooms. The two case studies she presents illustrate the complexity and rhetorical awareness underlying these short forms. http://wp.me/p5NPq1-2O