TWO NEW SUMMARIES AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY!

In the June College Composition and Communication, Chris Anson explores what happens when an expert writer attempts a new genre. And Joanne Baird Giordano and Holly  Hassel argue in the May Teaching English in the Two-Year College for the value of developmental work and open access, even if not every student succeeds.

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AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: Learning English in Cameroon

College Composition Weekly BannerWriting in the May Research in the Teaching of English, Vivian Yenika-Agbaw analyzes textbooks used to teach English in her home country, Cameroon, during the colonial, postindependence, postcolonial, and globalization periods. She is particularly interested in how textbooks construct citizenship in an emerging nation.

LATEST AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: Fanfiction as a “Gift Economy.”

In the June 2016 Computers and Composition, Brittany Kelley analyzes the Ashwinder archive in the Sycophant Hex Harry Potter fanfiction site to posit that such sites function as “gift economies” rather than as “commodity cultures.”

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THIS WEEK’S POST AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: International Responses to Composition Theory

CCW banner 300Lisa R. Arnold, writing in the Spring issue of Composition Studies, discusses her exchanges with faculty at the American University of Beirut during a two-semester seminar on rhetoric and composition theory as it has been developed in North America for monolingual audiences. In particular, she details the responses of faculty teaching in Lebanon to the theory of “translingualism” as proposed by Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, Jacqueline Jones Royster, and John Trimbur.

MORE “DIGITAL HUMANITIES”: Finding Genre Signals

Ryan Omizo and William Hart-Davidson, in a special section of the Journal of Writing ResearchCCW banner 300, present a tool for digital text analysis that detects the differences in novice and expert academic citation practices, helping graduate students understand the genres relevant to their fields.

ANALYZING TEXTS IN THE AGE OF DIGITAL HUMANITIES!

Cheryl Geisler introduces a special section in the latest issue of  Journal of Writing Research exploring the promise of digital text analysis. Next week: one of the articles in the special section.

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AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: Is Creative Writing an Academic Discipline?

CCW banner 300Check out Trent Hergenrader’s claims in the new Journal of Creative Writing Studies that creative writing needs to be more proactive if its practitioners want to thrive in the academy.

AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: STUDYING LITERACY PRACTICES!

CCW banner 300In the Feb. 2016 Research in the Teaching of English, Amy Stornaiuolo and Robert Jean LeBlanc introduce the concept of scalar analysis as a heuristic for investigating how literacy practices circulate and change in value across a stratified global universe.

COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: DO ACADEMICS REALLY WRITE THIS WAY?

Zak Lancaster in College Composition and Communication analyzes the templates (“formulas?”) offered in the college writing textbook They Say/I Say. Do they really reflect the choices academic writers make? Check out what he found!

Do you teach academic writing? What do you think about Lancaster’s claims?

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THIS WEEK AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY:

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Ryan P. Shepherd argues in Computers and Composition that composition hasn’t paid enough attention to the ways gender works when Web 2.0 sites like  Facebook are used in writing classrooms.