THIS WEEK’S SUMMARY AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY!

Jacqueline Preston, in College Composition and Communication, argues for a “project-based” model in composition classes. College Composition Weekly Banner

THIS WEEK AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY!

In the Journal of the Council of Writing Program AdministratorsCollege Composition Weekly BannerAmy Vidali proposes “disabling” the narratives of writing Program administrators (WPAs) to open productive conversation about the intersection between disability and WPA work.

NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: PLACEMENT AND REMEDIATION

BOOKS SUCCESSHassel, Holly, and Joanne Baird Giordano. “The Blurry Borders of College Writing: Remediation and the Assessment of Student Readiness.” College English 78.1 (2015): 56-80. Print.

Holly Hassel and Joanne Baird Giordano advocate for the use of multiple assessment measures rather than standardized test scores in decisions about placing entering college students in remedial or developmental courses.College Composition Weekly Banner

NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: Heterosexual Readers Read LGBT Novels.

Writing in Teaching English in the Two-Year College, John Pruitt reports on a case study of eight heterosexual students who chose LGBT novels and met to discuss them without a teacher’s intervention. Recording the sessions, Pruitt discovered concerns about “authenticity”; he posits that the need to create authenticity in depicting a culture can encourage essentialized perceptions of that culture, despite the diversity of its members. He feels that insights into what students bring to literature before an instructor’s theoretical framing helps him better understand how to teach literature about difference.
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Virginia Anderson's photo.

NEW THIS WEEK ON COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY! Pamela Takayoshi on “Short-Form” Writing for the Internet

Writing in the July issue of Computers and Composition, Takayoshi argues that composition studies has paid too little attention to increasingly common and prominent forms of communication like the Facebook postings and chats she analyzes. Such writing, she says, deserves empirical study, especially with regard to “what writers do” as they compose. She urges supplementing what she sees as composition’s longstanding “social turn” with fine-grained examination of actual writers’ processes working with current technologies in order to better understand how these processes relate to the composing processes taught in college writing classrooms. The two case studies she presents illustrate the complexity and rhetorical awareness underlying these short forms. http://wp.me/p5NPq1-2O

New Post at College Composition Weekly: Karen Kopelson in College English on Career Guides for ASD Adults

Kopelson analyzes workplace guides for “high-functioning” ASD individuals, arguing that the books construct such employees as examples of “capitalist wish-fulfillment” (560), both lauding the supposed deficits that make them ideal workers and advising them to “norm” themselves in order to “adapt” and “fit in” (563-64). Kopelson argues that the guidebooks employ implicit pedagogical and rhetorical theory and methods that highlight tensions within composition studies and between composition and disability studies. http://wp.me/p5NPq1-2K

This Week’s Post on College Composition Weekly: Meghan A. Sweeney and Maureen MvBride on the “Difficulty Paper” Assignment

Sweeney and McBride, both of the University of Nevada, Reno, suggest an assignment created by Carnegie Scholar Mariolina Salvatori, the “difficulty paper,” to understand how students understand the relationship between the reading and writing they are asked to do in college. They posit that the instruction they get in their process writing classrooms interferes with their ability to navigate complex reading tasks. See http://collegecompositionweekly.com/2015/07/06/sweeney-meghan-a-and-maureen-mcbride-difficulty-papers-as-insights-into-students-reading-practices-ccc-june-2015-posted-07062015/