TODAY AT JUST CAN’T HELP WRITING: CHECK OUT THIS POST ON CADENCE AND BEATS IN YOUR WRITING!

Creative outputWriters in the Storm features guest blogger Margie Lawson‘s excellent discussion of how to use rhythm and cadence to enhance the flow of your prose. I provide some additional resources and links to my earlier posts on Novel First Lines and punctuation. Let me know what rhetorical devices you use! http://tinyurl.com/pq7bjkd

NEW THIS WEEK AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: COLLABORATIVE COURSE DESIGN IN SCIENTIFIC WRITING.

A detailed discussion of course design for an upper-level scientific writing class: Alphabet letters poured in a heapCombs, D. Shane, Erin A. Frost, and Michelle F. Eble. “”Collaborative Course Design in Scientific Writing: Experimentation and Productive Failure.” Composition Studies 43.2 (2015): 132-49. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.

THIS WEEK’S SUMMARY AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY!

Jacqueline Preston, in College Composition and Communication, argues for a “project-based” model in composition classes. College Composition Weekly Banner

NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: PLACEMENT AND REMEDIATION

BOOKS SUCCESSHassel, Holly, and Joanne Baird Giordano. “The Blurry Borders of College Writing: Remediation and the Assessment of Student Readiness.” College English 78.1 (2015): 56-80. Print.

Holly Hassel and Joanne Baird Giordano advocate for the use of multiple assessment measures rather than standardized test scores in decisions about placing entering college students in remedial or developmental courses.College Composition Weekly Banner

THIS WEEK AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: Student Understanding of Plagiarism

This week at College Composition Weekly: David W. Hartwig, writing in Teaching English in the Two-Year College,College Composition Weekly Banner argues that students come to college with good “objective” knowledge about what constitutes plagiarism but struggle to identify it in actual passages. He agrees with Rebecca Moore Howard that practices like “patchwriting” are steps toward effective academic discourse; these instances of apparent plagiarism, he argues, measure students’ ability to read and understand complex scholarly writing rather than their honesty. He urges that work on critical reading be coordinated with writing and that faculty across campus share the task of teaching the correct use of sources. http://tinyurl.com/q9aod2l

NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: ENGAGING STUDENTS WITH ARCHIVES

VanHaitsma, Pamela. “New Pedagogical Engagements with Archives: Student Inquiry and Composing in Digital Spaces.” College English 78.1 (2015): 34-55. Web. 2 Sept. 2015.

Pamela VanHaitsma discusses an approach to involving students in archival research that she developed in first-year-writing classes at the University of Pittsburgh. Maintaining that students explore as well as create archives throughout their activities both in and outside of class, VanHaitsma hopes to connect the kinds of inquiry that archives make possible with the focus on student interest and lives that informs writing pedagogy. She also investigates how digital collection and dissemination options affect the process of using and building an archive. College Composition Weekly Banner.

NEW POST AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: CRITIQUE OF ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING IN SCHOOL AND COLLEGE, RTE AUGUST 2015

Todd DeStigter of the University of Chicago critiques the emphasis on argumentative writing in schools and college, examining three widespread assumptions: that learning to write good arguments will develop thinking skills, prepare for good democratic citizenship, and enhance students’ potential for sociocultural mobility. Valorizing rational argument, DeStigter argues, closes off many legitimate and often more effective forms of personal and political action.College Composition Weekly Banner

NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: Heterosexual Readers Read LGBT Novels.

Writing in Teaching English in the Two-Year College, John Pruitt reports on a case study of eight heterosexual students who chose LGBT novels and met to discuss them without a teacher’s intervention. Recording the sessions, Pruitt discovered concerns about “authenticity”; he posits that the need to create authenticity in depicting a culture can encourage essentialized perceptions of that culture, despite the diversity of its members. He feels that insights into what students bring to literature before an instructor’s theoretical framing helps him better understand how to teach literature about difference.
http://wp.me/p5NPq1-2Z
collegecompositionweekly.com

Virginia Anderson's photo.

At Just Can’t Help Writing: Grammar Rules You DON’T Need!

Check out my latest installment of “How Much Grammar Do You Need?” I argue that these three rules can safely be ignored. They aren’t even real “rules”! http://wp.me/p1KFmw-6g