NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: PLACEMENT AND REMEDIATION

BOOKS SUCCESSHassel, Holly, and Joanne Baird Giordano. “The Blurry Borders of College Writing: Remediation and the Assessment of Student Readiness.” College English 78.1 (2015): 56-80. Print.

Holly Hassel and Joanne Baird Giordano advocate for the use of multiple assessment measures rather than standardized test scores in decisions about placing entering college students in remedial or developmental courses.College Composition Weekly Banner

NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: ONLINE INTERFACE AS EXORDIUM

New at College Composition Weekly: In the September College English, Rebecca Tarsa proposes strategies for creating an effective “exordium” for writing classrooms by examining how the digital interface works as an exordium in online participatory sites in which students voluntarily contribute writing. She draws on Teena Carnegie’s work to argue that the interface of an online site meets Cicero’s definition of the exordium as an appeal designed to “make the listener ‘well-disposed, attentive, and receptive’ to the ensuring speech.” In the case of an online site, the interface as exordium accomplishes this goal by “project[ing] to users the potential for interactivity within the site that matches their desired engagement while also supporting the ends of the site itself.” Adopting some features of online interfaces can trigger more voluntary and spontaneous writing in composition classes.

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NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: ENGAGING STUDENTS WITH ARCHIVES

VanHaitsma, Pamela. “New Pedagogical Engagements with Archives: Student Inquiry and Composing in Digital Spaces.” College English 78.1 (2015): 34-55. Web. 2 Sept. 2015.

Pamela VanHaitsma discusses an approach to involving students in archival research that she developed in first-year-writing classes at the University of Pittsburgh. Maintaining that students explore as well as create archives throughout their activities both in and outside of class, VanHaitsma hopes to connect the kinds of inquiry that archives make possible with the focus on student interest and lives that informs writing pedagogy. She also investigates how digital collection and dissemination options affect the process of using and building an archive. College Composition Weekly Banner.

New Post at College Composition Weekly: Karen Kopelson in College English on Career Guides for ASD Adults

Kopelson analyzes workplace guides for “high-functioning” ASD individuals, arguing that the books construct such employees as examples of “capitalist wish-fulfillment” (560), both lauding the supposed deficits that make them ideal workers and advising them to “norm” themselves in order to “adapt” and “fit in” (563-64). Kopelson argues that the guidebooks employ implicit pedagogical and rhetorical theory and methods that highlight tensions within composition studies and between composition and disability studies. http://wp.me/p5NPq1-2K