THIS WEEK’S POST AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: “Devilish Smartphones”

www.collegecompositionweekly.comJenae Cohn, writing in the December Computers and Composition, provides case studies of student digital literacy narratives to study how the “addiction trope” influences student views of their social-media use.

NEW POSTS AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY!

In the June issue of College Composition and Communication, Stuart Blythe and Laura Gonzales use screencast videos to track what students actually do as they compose a researched argument for an interdisciplinary biology class.

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In the new College English, Sara Webb-Sunderhaus uses the lens of “tellability” to explore how teacher expectations shape identity performance for students from Appalachia.

TWO NEW POSTS AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY !

Jennifer Grouling and Jackie Grutsch McKinney investigate whether students are actually doing multimodal writing and whether they¬† know what “multimodality” means! Computers and Composition, in press.

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Suzanne Choo argues that literature can counter the pressures of “strategic cosmopolitanism,” in which education is just an economic investment and not a means of fostering ethical relationships. May Research in the Teaching of English.

 

THIS WEEK AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: Do Peer Reviews Match Instructor Ratings?

www.collegecompositionweekly.comIn the Spring 2016 issue of the Journal of the Council of Writing Program Administrators (WPA), Joseph M. Moxley and David Eubanks report on a study of 46,689 ratings of essays to discover whether student ratings correlate with instructor ratings of intermediate drafts in first-year writing courses.

NEW AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY! RHETORIC AS “POSTHUMAN PRACTICE”

www.collegecompositionweekly.comIn the July College English, Casey Boyle makes a case for rejecting “reflection” as crucial to the “habits of mind” encouraged by the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing and replacing it with an “ecological orientation” appropriate to “posthumanism.”

TWO NEW SUMMARIES AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY!

In the June College Composition and Communication, Chris Anson explores what happens when an expert writer attempts a new genre. And Joanne Baird Giordano and Holly  Hassel argue in the May Teaching English in the Two-Year College for the value of developmental work and open access, even if not every student succeeds.

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AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: Learning English in Cameroon

College Composition Weekly BannerWriting in the May Research in the Teaching of English, Vivian Yenika-Agbaw analyzes textbooks used to teach English in her home country, Cameroon, during the colonial, postindependence, postcolonial, and globalization periods. She is particularly interested in how textbooks construct citizenship in an emerging nation.

THIS WEEK’S POST AT COLLEGE COMPOSITION WEEKLY: International Responses to Composition Theory

CCW banner 300Lisa R. Arnold, writing in the Spring issue of Composition Studies, discusses her exchanges with faculty at the American University of Beirut during a two-semester seminar on rhetoric and composition theory as it has been developed in North America for monolingual audiences. In particular, she details the responses of faculty teaching in Lebanon to the theory of “translingualism” as proposed by Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, Jacqueline Jones Royster, and John Trimbur.

MORE “DIGITAL HUMANITIES”: Finding Genre Signals

Ryan Omizo and William Hart-Davidson, in a special section of the Journal of Writing ResearchCCW banner 300, present a tool for digital text analysis that detects the differences in novice and expert academic citation practices, helping graduate students understand the genres relevant to their fields.